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The NIEER blog reporting on research, policy, and practice

Preschool Matters Today

New York and Ohio: Early Education Caught Up in a Fiscal Crisis


March 21, 2011

Research by early childhood stakeholders in New York and Ohio finds that expanding pre-K has the potential to improve the supply of high-quality child care in those and other states. Our recent research has found that child care providers participating in state funded pre-K report receiving additional funding, technical assistance, and support that enables them…

Selling our Children’s Birthright


March 4, 2011

Is Anybody Listening to Ben, David and Paul? Anyone interested in our children’s future — and thus that of our nation — should be alarmed at the news coming from state houses and Capitol Hill these days. From Georgia to Iowa to Texas, governors are proposing to cut early childhood education in their efforts to…

Teachers Must Get the Facts Out and Support Smart Evaluation, Pay and Tenure Reform


February 17, 2011 AssessmentWorkforce

These days teachers find themselves swept up in the cross currents of an education debate about how to evaluate and pay teachers that is more polarizing and ugly by the day. Some days the debate generates much more heat than light, and this topic is greatly in need of illumination. Without at doubt, change is…

Will New Jersey Gut Its Abbott Preschool Program? Or, How to Ruin Absolutely Everything


February 4, 2011 Outcomes
W. Steven Barnett, Ph.D.

New Jersey Republicans are floating a proposal to cut the state’s highly effective Abbott Preschool Program from a full day of services to half a day. This, they say, would free up about $300 million in school funding that could be “more equitably” disbursed statewide.  As is so often the case with such figures, the…

The State of the Union and Early Education


January 28, 2011

Like many others I was disappointed that President Obama didn’t mention early childhood education in his State of the Union Speech. Yet when he talked about education, government, and the American people the president said many of the right things for our early learning programs. He noted a sense of urgency when he said the…

Early Childhood Education and the U.S. Labor Market Crisis


January 21, 2011 Outcomes

Guest post by Tim Bartik , Senior Economist, Upjohn Institute for Employment Research As Steve Barnett’s recent post indicated, the U.S. faces a prolonged labor market recovery. As of today, the U.S. would need more than 10 million additional jobs to return to the employment to population ratio at the beginning of this recession (December 2007). Based on typical job growth rates, the U.S. will take five to 10 years before returning to “normal” employment conditions. Given…

Suffer the Children: An Alarming Confluence of Events


January 14, 2011 Outcomes

While investors are celebrating brighter prospects, the news from the hinterlands continues in a much darker vein. The Wall Street Journal reports that wages for a broad swath of the labor force have taken a “sharp and swift” fall to an extent rarely seen since the Great Depression. Between 2007 and 2009 more than half…

First Do No Harm: It’s Time to Address Our Quality Problem


January 6, 2011 Outcomes

In the next several years, those of us who believe government policies can and should help children and families are going to be in a tough fight.  We need to be clear that this is not so much a fight for money as it is a fight for learning and development — a fight to…

Early Education Seen in a Human Capital Framework


December 23, 2010

The idea that education leads to the accumulation of capital in the form of more productive workers and that this returns a profit to those who invest in it goes all the way back to Scottish philosopher Adam Smith, the man considered the father of capitalism and whose The Wealth of Nations is considered the…

What the PISA Scores Are Telling Us


December 17, 2010 AssessmentOutcomes

There is much talk in Finland these days about the country’s showing in the recent international comparison of PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) scores — not the self-congratulation one might expect from a country that topped yet again the list of high performing countries, but rather a sober look at the report’s nuances. A…