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Recent early education news and updates

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Pre-K boosts future incomes, reduces risk of jail, when schools spend more


June 19, 2017
Matt Barnum
Chalkbeat

It’s an issue that has long puzzled policymakers: Why do some early childhood programs produce big benefits for students, but others don’t?

The answer may be linked to what happens after kids leave the programs altogether and move through school.

That’s the conclusion of a working paper released Monday. Economists Kirabo Jackson of Northwestern and Rucker Johnson of Berkeley find that students benefit from both well-funded schools and access to early childhood education — and that Head Start had greater long-run benefits for students whose K-12 schools were better resourced.

In other words, the whole of those two policies in tandem is greater than the sum of their parts.

“The findings suggest that early investments in the skills of disadvantaged children that are followed by sustained educational investments over time can effectively break the cycle of poverty,” the researchers write.

With the latest analysis, Jackson and Johnson build on previous work (coauthored with Claudia Persico) that found that court-ordered increases in school spending meant students were more likely to attend college and make more money as adults.

The duo used the same national data to connect school spending to the rollout of Head Start, a federally funded preschool program for poor children. The key question was whether additional funding is a complement or replacement for the program — that is, does more money for K-12 schools make Head Start more effective or less necessary?

The results point to the former.